cornea

Ophthalmia neonatorum treatment and prophylaxis: IPOSC global study

AAPOS,Chlamydia trachomatis,Conjunctivitis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae,Ophthalmia neonatorum; Prophylaxis
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2016 Jan 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Ophthalmia neonatorum treatment and prophylaxis: IPOSC global study.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Characteristics of ophthalmia neonatorum (ON) amongst paediatric ophthalmologists remain unclear. The purpose of this current study is to examine the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis of ON cases presenting to members of the American Association of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS).

METHODS:

An email containing a web link to a survey was sent to all members of AAPOS. The questionnaire examined the incidence of ON, etiology, diagnostic methods, treatment, and prophylaxis of the disease in different countries around the world.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and ninety-one ophthalmologists answered the questionnaire. Most were from North America (52.94 %). One hundred and seventy-six (60.69 %) ophthalmologists encountered 0-5 cases of ON per year. The most common pathogens causing ON was Chlamydia trachomatis (35.37 %). Two hundred and forty-two (85.21 %) treat empirically when encountering ON during the first 10 days of life and 205 (75.09 %) after the first 10 days of life. In both cases, erythromycin was the most common first line of treatment. Two hundred and twenty-two (78.72 %) ophthalmologists replied that prophylactic treatment is required in their country. The most common agent for prophylaxis was erythromycin ointment (71.50 %).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that the incidence of ON per year per practitioner is 0-5 cases, the most common etiology is C. trachomatis, and most infants receive prophylaxis and treatment.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and ninety-one ophthalmologists answered the questionnaire. Most were from North America (52.94 %). One hundred and seventy-six (60.69 %) ophthalmologists encountered 0-5 cases of ON per year. The most common pathogens causing ON was Chlamydia trachomatis (35.37 %). Two hundred and forty-two (85.21 %) treat empirically when encountering ON during the first 10 days of life and 205 (75.09 %) after the first 10 days of life. In both cases, erythromycin was the most common first line of treatment. Two hundred and twenty-two (78.72 %) ophthalmologists replied that prophylactic treatment is required in their country. The most common agent for prophylaxis was erythromycin ointment (71.50 %).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that the incidence of ON per year per practitioner is 0-5 cases, the most common etiology is C. trachomatis, and most infants receive prophylaxis and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

AAPOS; Chlamydia trachomatis; Conjunctivitis; IPOSC; Neisseria gonorrhoeae; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Prophylaxis