Cataracts and Cataract Surgery

Removal of intracameral metallic foreign body by encapsulation with an intraocular lens injector

metallic foreign body,intraocular lens injector
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2015 Dec;41(12):2605-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.10.046.

Removal of intracameral metallic foreign body by encapsulation with an intraocular lens injector.

Abstract

We describe a technique in which a metallic foreign body in the anterior chamber is safely removed by encapsulation with an intraocular lens (IOL) injector instead of with a forceps or a magnet. A forceps sometimes provides inadequate grip over an intraocular foreign body and requires a large incision, which may damage the surrounding tissue. A magnet is an alternative to a forceps; however, magnets are ineffective in removing nonmagnetic foreign bodies and are seldom available in every operating room. We propose that the IOL injector can be used as an effective tool for extracting both magnetic and nonmagnetic intracameral foreign bodies

J Cataract Refract Surg. 2015 Dec;41(12):2605-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.10.046.

Removal of intracameral metallic foreign body by encapsulation with an intraocular lens injector.

Abstract

We describe a technique in which a metallic foreign body in the anterior chamber is safely removed by encapsulation with an intraocular lens (IOL) injector instead of with a forceps or a magnet. A forceps sometimes provides inadequate grip over an intraocular foreign body and requires a large incision, which may damage the surrounding tissue. A magnet is an alternative to a forceps; however, magnets are ineffective in removing nonmagnetic foreign bodies and are seldom available in every operating room. We propose that the IOL injector can be used as an effective tool for extracting both magnetic and nonmagnetic intracameral foreign bodies

J Cataract Refract Surg. 2015 Dec;41(12):2605-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2015.10.046.

Abstract

We describe a technique in which a metallic foreign body in the anterior chamber is safely removed by encapsulation with an intraocular lens (IOL) injector instead of with a forceps or a magnet. A forceps sometimes provides inadequate grip over an intraocular foreign body and requires a large incision, which may damage the surrounding tissue. A magnet is an alternative to a forceps; however, magnets are ineffective in removing nonmagnetic foreign bodies and are seldom available in every operating room. We propose that the IOL injector can be used as an effective tool for extracting both magnetic and nonmagnetic intracameral foreign bodies